Picture you're a burglar. You've gotten into a house and it's definitely a plush pad, but while browsing the items you plan on pilfering you see a picture of the owner.

DOLPH LUNDGREN INTERVIEW

Picture you're a burglar. You've gotten into a house and it's definitely a plush pad, but while browsing the items you plan on pilfering you see a picture of the owner.

Developed A Computer Game

That's the question Drexel University researchers wish to answer with one of two new research studies introducing this month. They have developed a computer game

Summertime storm causes

The administration and personnel at Fair Acres begin five months ahead of the Fair to raise money towards the event. They kick off the fundraising by holding special pizza days

Computer Games

 

 

Drexel researchers develop computer game

Drexel researchers develop computer game and mobile app to help people slim down

Can a computer game train your brain to resist sweets?

That's the question Drexel University researchers wish to answer with one of two new research studies introducing this month. They have developed a computer game and smartphone app to assist individuals control unhealthy consuming practices and ultimately slim down.

The video game is developed to improve an individual's "repressive control," the part of the brain that stops you from giving into unhealthy food cravings-- even when the smell of French fries is virtually pleading you to step inside a fast food dining establishment.

For the 2nd research study, the scientists have developed a mobile app that intelligently discovers patterns in a person's consuming habits. When users are most likely to slip from their dietary plans, the app offers customized methods to put them back on track.

Scientists in Drexel's Laboratory for Innovations in Health-Related Behavior Change are now seeking individuals for both research studies.

Sixty-nine percent of grownups living in Philadelphia are obese or overweight, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While a number of factors contribute to the city's obesity epidemic, typically the mind is the greatest barrier when it pertains to reducing weight, stated Evan Forman, PhD, teacher of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences. It's been shown, for instance, that sweet foods activate the exact same feel-good brain chemicals as addictive drugs.

"Millions of individuals are trying to lose weight, and they are going about it in a sensible method - by trying to decrease calories.”You might state the trick of assisting individuals really lose weight is avoiding these lapses, so we focused on how to best do that."

Enhance Your Game, Train Your Brain

All day, you have to make choices about exactly what foods you consume. And it's clear that there is "an effective part of your mind that drives you towards things that taste good and feel excellent," Forman stated.

Let's say an associate brings a box of doughnuts into the office. That reaction is usually slower and less strong than impulse according to Forman.

"However, studies have actually revealed that if you do certain jobs that include this repressive control over and over once again, it in fact gets more powerful," he stated.

Forman and a group of scientists evaluated this theory in a current study, released this summer in the journal Appetite. Habitual snack food eaters were assigned to one of four short, training workouts created to increase their conscious decision-making and strengthen their inhibitory control. The study concluded that both kinds of training were successful in decreasing junk food consuming.

The researchers now want to discover whether inhibitory control training can help participants lower their consumption of sweet foods, and ultimately slim down.

Their brand-new training game-- called DietDash-- very first requires study participants to reveal the types of sugary foods they take in most frequently. They will then be assigned to one of four variations of a video game that is tailored to their diet plan. If someone lists soda and chocolate chip cookies as their favorite deals with, those items will appear in the game.

Players are advised to push particular secrets to react to various types of images, including pictures of yummy sweet foods and photos of healthy foods. As the player's repressive control improves, the video game speed increases for an additional obstacle. Users are instructed to play this video game for eight minutes each day, every day for 6 weeks.

Other research studies have actually revealed this type of training at least momentarily affects users' eating routines; the researchers want to know what will happen over a course of 2 months. The job is funded with a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

"The study is actually the first to try to train individuals for weeks in a row," Forman stated. "We believe this can mean real-world behaviors, because similar to any job, it enhances with practice."

When the research study is complete, Forman stated the computer game could likewise be developed into a mobile app.

An App That Watches Your Weight

The scientists' 2nd design is a weight-loss app called DietAlert, developed with funding from Weight Watchers and the Obesity Society.

Used in conjunction with the Weight Watchers app, the smartphone application collects details about users' consuming practices and uses a mathematical algorithm to identify when they are more than likely to lapse from their diet plan plans.

The app may conclude that a person is most likely to consume scrap food after lunch when she has avoided breakfast. As the app learns more about somebody's patterns, it will send a warning alert and offer a tip to help the user stick to his/her health insurance.

"Part of the problem with a diet plan comes from a failure to determine and target aspects that continue to cause lapses over and over once again," Forman stated.

The DietAlert app differentiates itself from the hundreds of other diet applications available, because it not only tracks an individual's eating routines, but it uses that info to give customized advice.

"This app targets each specific person precisely when they need the aid," Forman stated.